Our response to COVID-19

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Project coorong v2

Many community members have contributed to science in the Coorong and have been playing their part in helping to restore the long-term health of this important place.

The involvement of these citizen scientists allows more data to be collected than is possible by using researchers alone, and adds important local interpretation to the data.

Our recent citizen science program, Project Coorong BioBlitz, saw community members join scientists at Parnka Point to conduct tests and learn more about:

  • which birds call the Coorong home, when and why
  • why macroinvertebrates (and other creepy crawlies) are so important to the health of the system
  • the role of aquatic plants, and how they help the health of the Coorong
  • what qualities the water and sediments need to have to sustain a healthy ecosystem for plants, waterbirds and fish.

To find out when the next citizen science event will be held, please email projectcoorong@sa.gov.au.

A short film ‘Science and Citizens of the Coorong’ produced by the Department for Environment and Water and the Murraylands and Riverland Landscape Board documents the story of South Australia’s iconic Coorong and the scientists and citizens that are helping return it to a healthy system.

Read more about our related priorities

Murray darling basin
Basin Plan
Irrigation
Water security
River murray irrigators
Water allocation