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Bascombe Well Conservation Park prescribed burn update

Date posted: 23 Sep 2019

Yesterday (19 September 2019) marked the start of the prescribed burning season on Eyre Peninsula with a successful burn completed by National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) fire crews in Bascombe Well Conservation Park.

The objective of this burn was to reduce fuels in the area to prevent the spread of bushfire and to reduce the risk of fire spreading to neighbouring properties and native scrub blocks.

NPWS Fire Management Officer Aaron Macumber said the burn area had very disconnected fuels, which need high winds and dry conditions for fire to carry and be successful.

“Yesterday’s weather conditions provided our crews with a great window of opportunity to create a significant fuel break ahead of the fire danger season,” Mr Macumber said.

“Burning along the edge of the area, completed last autumn, created a fuel break that was four kilometres long and an average of 300 metres deep.

“This allowed crews to safely burn the fuels alongside it, while managing any risk of escapes.

“It’s important for the community to know we plan these burns very carefully, over long periods of time, and consider all risks to ensure we can manage them effectively.

“A number of test burns were completed prior to ignition, and we delayed the burn until the fire behaviour was ideal later in the day.

“This was supported by Bureau of Meteorology forecasts and detailed calculations of fire spread.

“Yesterday’s burn was fully supported by both the local and state CFS and highly trained crews monitored conditions on the ground throughout the operation.

“Crews conducted the burn under the diminishing winds and ahead of 20 millimetres of rain overnight, delivering an excellent result.

“We take our role in reducing risk to the community very seriously and we are able to pick our conditions to conduct these burns safely - some of which require higher winds to burn effectively.

“The pre-planning, expertise and resources available to NPWS meant that we were able to safely conduct this burn in these conditions.

“Understandably, burn offs by private landholders without such resources were not encouraged.”

NPWS thanks the neighbours, and local and regional CFS staff and volunteers for their support throughout this process.

Two more prescribed burns are planned for the Eyre Peninsula’s spring program - Lincoln National Park and private land at Mount Hope.

For the most up-to-date information on prescribed burns follow @SAENVIRWATER on Twitter.

A list of planned prescribed burns is available on the DEW website.