Chowilla Game Reserve

  • Picnic Areas
  • Campfires Permitted
  • Caravan Sites
  • Toilets
  • Camping
  • Swimming
  • Dogs on Lead
  • Canoeing
  • Fishing
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
  • Boating
PDF Park Brochure
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Chowilla SA map

Chowilla Game Reserve's majestic gums and tranquil waterways can be enjoyed with walking shoes, a canoe, a tent, a caravan or at a picnic spot. Get away from it all, but be sure to bring your camera and binoculars for rare glimpses of protected Australian birdlife.

About

Explore Chowilla Game Reserve and the great stands of the majestic river red gum and the hardy black box providing habitat for the diverse wildlife of the park. Discover the peaceful waterways of the Murray River and its anabranches by canoe while observing the array of birdlife. Due to its remote nature, Chowilla provides great opportunities for secluded bush camping and disconnecting from the world ﴾with limited phone reception﴿.

The game reserve is an integral part of the Riverland Biosphere Reserve, comprising 18,000 hectares of floodplains and wetlands.  Chowilla is an important refuge for waterbird populations. It is recognised as a Riverland Wetland of International Importance declared under the Ramsar convention, and one of the six The Living Murray icon sites in the Murray-Darling Basin.

Opening hours

Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger. The park may also be closed during high rainfall events when roads and campsites become slippery and boggy, as well as times when there are high water levels in the wetlands. Please contact us if you are unsure.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest daily weather updates and information on fire safety.

Contact details

Natural Resource Centre - Berri
Phone: (+61 8) 8580 1800

For booking enquiries please email:

DEWNR.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Getting there

Chowilla campsites

Chowilla Game Reserve is located 305km northeast of Adelaide. Access is via Old Wentworth Road north of Renmark ﴾48km﴿. Please take care driving on the Old Wentworth road as there are many kangaroos and the road surface may have loose gravel or pot holes.

Border Cliff campground

The Border Cliffs Campground is located 294km northeast of Adelaide via Murtho Road, or 30.5km northeast of Paringa.

Pets in parks

You and your dog can enjoy the Chowilla Game Reserve provided that you keep your dog on a lead and under your control at all times. Don't forget to bring your disposable 'doggie‐doo' bag to clean up after your dog. Dogs are not permitted in the Border Cliffs campground area.

Facilities

There are picnic areas, caravan and camp sites available in this park. Toilets are only located at the Border Cliffs campground.

Useful information

Traditional-owners

Aboriginal South Australians are the first peoples of our State and have occupied, enjoyed and managed these lands and waters since the creation. For SA's First Peoples, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

Aboriginal peoples' oral histories and creation stories traverse the length and breadth of Australia’s lands and waters, including South Australian Parks. These stories interconnect land and waters with complex meaning and values and hold great cultural significance. We recognise and respect Aboriginal people's ownership of their stories and that they hold rights and obligations to care for Country. It is through these rights and cultural obligations and a shared goal to protect the environment for generations to come that DEWNR is committed to meaningful collaboration and involvement with Aboriginal peoples in the management of our shared parks.

When to visit

Climatically and scenically, autumn and spring are the best times to visit Riverland parks. However, the climate of the Riverland makes it suitable for visiting parks most of the year. The summer months of January and February can be hot.

Roads along the flood plain are generally unsuitable for driving on immediately after heavy rains. This, and other hazards such as bush fire, can force the temporary closure of some sections of the park. Keep your eye on this website for up to date information.

See and do

Stay in the park

Wake up to peaceful sounds of the River Murray and its water birds.

There are two campgrounds in Chowilla Game Reserve available, check the book before you go links for more information on each site.

Border Cliffs Campground

Chowilla campground

Canoeing and kayaking

Exploring the waterways with a canoe or small boat is a great way to take in the sights of the floodplain. Meander down the quiet waters of Chowilla, Monoman and Punkah Creeks under the shade of mighty river red gums and black box trees.

For information on how to purchase, detailed, independently produced, canoe trail maps please contact the Berri Visitor Information Centre or the Renmark Paringa Visitor Information Centre

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends.

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Easy walks

  • Wetland Walking Trail (1 hours 30 mins return, 4km) 

Enjoy a one-and-a-half hour return walk from the car park and discover this special wetland system. Take the 350 mete detour to the lagoon and observe a variety of native birds including great egrets, superb fairy-wrens and white-faced herons.  Return to the main path and take-in excellent views of the Murray River sandstone cliffs in the distance.  

Along the way, watch for parrots, bats, possums, kookaburras, kangaroos, lizards and other wildlife.

Mountain biking

 You can ride your bike along any public access road within the park. There are no specifically designated cycling tracks in this park.

Flora

Chowilla Game Reserve contains flood plain and wetland environments, and is one of the last areas of the lower Murray that has kept much of its natural character. It contains the largest remaining natural river red gum forest in the lower Murray.

With age, river red gums (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) form hollows or holes in their trunks or branches. These hollows provide shelter and nesting sites for a great variety of animals including parrots, bats, possums, snakes and insects. The nationally vulnerable regent parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) will only breed in hollows in river red gums along the Murray River, so these trees are highly significant for the regent parrot’s survival.

Fauna

Large numbers of waterbirds, bush birds and native fauna can be seen in Chowilla Game Reserve making this the perfect destination for bird watchers and nature photographers.

Bird watching basics:

If you’ve already spotted a bird on your walk, then congratulations, you’re a birdwatcher!  Here are few tips for being a better birdwatcher:

  • Remove (or turn inside out) any brightly coloured jackets
  • Move quietly and calmly into a comfortable sitting or standing position
  • Keep noise and movement to a minimum
  • Look at different levels – on the ground, in the reeds, on tree trunks and branches, and in the treetops. 
  • Bring binoculars and a field guide for your next visit.

Volunteering

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources South Australian Murray-Darling Basin – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

Become a campground host

Combine your love of camping with doing a good deed by becoming a volunteer campground host in this park.

A campground host is a volunteer who stays at the park either for a specific peak period, like the Easter break or a long weekend, or an extended period of time ﴾up to a few months﴿ to support park rangers.

If you are passionate about the environment, a keen camper, like to meet people from all around the world, and are a happy to help, then hosting could be right up your alley.

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times. Ensure that you:

  • keep to defined walking trails and follow the trail markers   for your own safety, and prevent the spread of declared weeds to other areas in the park
  • wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • please be respectful of others at all times
  • carry sufficient drinking water
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • inform a responsible person of your proposed route and expected time of return, take appropriate maps
  • ensure you have appropriate wet weather clothing as weather conditions can change quickly.
  • Walk, hike or trek ‐ what's the difference?
  • Bushwalking Minimum Impact Code

Camping

When camping in a National Park, it's important to remember the following:

  • Never camp directly under a large River Red Gum. These trees are susceptible to dropping large branches at any time which may endanger your safety or life.
  • Always let someone responsible know your travel plans, especially when travelling in remote areas. It's a good idea to let them know when you expect to return.
  • Check the weather forecast before you leave, including overnight temperatures on the Bureau of Meteorology. Even during very mild weather, the nights can get very cold.
  • The quality and quantity of water cannot be guaranteed within parks. Please bring plenty of water and food to be self‐sufficient.
  • Always camp in designated sites. It's also a good idea to check that there are no insect nests nearby.
  • Check to make sure you're not camping in a natural waterway.
  • If camp fires are permitted, you must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. Dead wood plays a vital role in providing shelter for many animals and is essential for adding nutrients to the soil for other native plants when rotting down. Extinguish your camp fire with water ﴾not sand or dirt﴿ until the hissing sound stops.
  • Ensure that you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park, as they differ from fire restriction dates set by the CFS.

4WD

  • Roads along the flood plain are generally unsuitable for driving on immediately after heavy rains. Expect varying road conditions along tracks with sandy, boggy and rocky patches. Vehicles are not permitted to drive off-road to navigate around these areas.
  • IMPORTANT: It is an offence regulated under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972, to drive/ride/tow a vehicle in an un-authorised area (off-track). Offenders will be fined $150 for each offence.
  • Take extreme care when driving in the park – be aware of blind corners, crests and narrow two‐way tracks.
  • When driving on sand, deflate your tyres to 105kPa ﴾15psi﴿ – or as appropriate for your vehicle. Don’t forget to re-inflate your tyres to the manufacturer’s recommended pressure before leaving the park. Take care when lowering tyre pressure as there is risk you could roll the tyre off its rim. Also, remember that lower tyre pressure can mean a change in how the vehicle handles.

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited between 1 November 2017 to 15 April 2018.

  • You must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited

  • Gas fires are permitted, except on days of total fire ban.

  • Ensure you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Know before you go

 Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer. Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home. Dogs are allowed in the Chowilla section only.
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology.
  • do not bring generators ﴾except where permitted﴿, chainsaws or firearms into the park.
  • help keep our parks beautiful by taking all your rubbish with you when you leave. Any rubbish left in campsites is an offence regulated under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972, and campers will be fined.
  • abide by the road rules ﴾maintain the speed limit﴿.
  • respect geological and heritage sites.
  • do not remove or damage native plants.
  • are considerate of other park users.
  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. Dead wood plays a vital role in providing shelter for many animals and is essential for adding nutrients to the soil for other native plants when rotting down.

Maps

Park maps

Canoeing trails

For information on how to purchase, detailed, independently produced, canoe trail maps please contact the Berri Visitor Information Centre or the Renmark Paringa Visitor Information Centre

Fees

Entry fees

Vehicle entry to this park is free, however fees apply for camping.

Camping and accommodation

Fees apply to camp in this park.

You must book and pay for your campsite before you arrive, as cash self-registration stations are no longer in use in this park.

If you are planning a trip for a school group or other large group, please ensure you let the park know of your intentions.

Alternative booking and payment options

Cash payments can be made at the following agents:

For booking enquiries please email:

DEWNR.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Park pass

 

This park is not included in the park pass system. 

PDF Park Brochure