Your guide to camping at Onkaparinga River National Park

Camp in a national park without venturing too far from Adelaide. Here’s everything you need to know.

Situated in the eastern corner of Onkaparinga River National Park, the new Pink Gum Campground makes camping convenient for city-dwellers. It’s now the closest place to Adelaide that you can stay in a campground run by a national park. Onkaparinga River National Park is just a 40-minute drive from the city and right across the road from some of McLaren Vale’s most popular wineries and vineyards. 

Surrounded by towering gum trees and walking trails, and close to the park’s rock climbing zone, this new campground is sure to become your family favourite.

Before you run off to pack the car, read these useful insider tips prepared for you by one of the first people to camp at the new campground:

Nearby activities

Bushwalking

 There are two main walking trails that depart from the campground. Take the River Hike down to the gorge where you can find a spot by one of the many rock pools to relax with your book.

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View of the gorge from the bottom of the River Track

Or if you’re up for a solid day of hiking, follow the gorge downstream to link up with one of the many new trails and lookouts to the north of the gorge.

You can also take the track down to the rock climbing zone, which boasts spectacular views of the gorge below. If you are not an experienced rock climber you will need to stay behind the rock climbing railing.

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View of the gorge from the rock climbing zone

Before you go, make sure you download the park maps, or if you’re the adventurous type, you might like to use the Avenza PDF Map app so you can see in real-time where you are in the park. This is particularly useful as some of the trails are not well defined.

Rock climbing

For those with the appropriate training, experience and equipment, rock climbing and abseiling opportunities are just a short 20 minute stroll away at the Onkaparinga River National Park Rock Climbing Zone.

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Rock climbers at the rock climbing zone

Kayaking

A kayak and canoe launch is located just a short drive away from the campground at the nearby Onkaparinga River Recreation Park’s main entrance at Perry's Bend. It’s fully equipped with steps and a ramp to help you slide your boat down to the water safely

Mountain biking

Head downstream from the campground to try out several great bike tracks on the northern side of the gorge. You’ll need to take your bike around to the other side of the gorge to access these trails. Not all trails allow bikes so be sure to download the cycling maps first.

Facilities

Toilets

A toilet, rainwater tank and sink/wash station is available for campers to use. The quality of the rainwater can’t be guaranteed though, so come prepared with your own drinking water.

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Toilet and wash/sink facilities at Pink Gum Campground

Electricity

Sites are not powered so you will need to be prepared to be self-sufficient.

Campsites

The campsites are very flat and are made of compacted dirt/gravel. Make sure you pack a hammer and solid pegs as it’ll take a bit of grunt work to get your tent pegs in.

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Campsite 8 at Pink Gum Campground

Although the campsites are fairly open and gravel-based, there is a communal grassy area in the middle that’s shaded by big Pink Gum trees with heaps of room to laze in the shade or for the kids to play cricket.

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Campers enjoying slacklining in the communal area in the middle of the campground

Most of the campsites are wheelchair accessible, as they are on flat ground with a compacted gravel surface. The road slopes down to the toilets but is accessible by car. The toilet facilities are wheelchair accessible, doors are 900 millimetre wide and there’s a fixed handrail alongside the toilet.

Fun fact – all the bollards and campground posts glow in the dark, so you won’t bump into them with your car. They look pretty cool at night too!

Know before you go

Book online

Pink Gum Campground is a ‘book before you go’ site, so be sure to reserve your site online before you head off so that it’s waiting for you when you arrive.

Maps

Use the Avenza PDF Map app to download interactive park maps. These maps can be used without internet connection and will track your current location in the park so you won’t get lost.

Campfires

Fire restrictions apply at all national parks. At Onkaparinga, gas fires are permitted throughout the year, other than on days of total fire ban. Wood fires and solid fuel fires are only permitted outside of the fire ban season in designated campfire pits. Next year, you can have a campfire from 1 May to 31 October 2018, unless there’s a total fire ban day in that period of time. Always check the SA Country Fire Service website to keep up-to-date about fire bans.

Also note, you must bring your own firewood if you plan to have a wood fire, as the collection of firewood within national parks is prohibited.

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Campers cooking dinner over the fire pits located within each campsite

Vehicle access

All the campsites are accessible by 2WD, with several of the larger sites also accessible to camper trailers and caravans.

No dogs allowed

Leave your pooch at home – Onkaparinga River National Park is a dog-free zone.

First campers

Onkaparinga River National Park is the closest national park run camping in metropolitan Adelaide where you can camp – and has only just opened.

Here’s what the first people that stayed at the new campgrounds had to say: 

‘Easy local camping spot with large flat camp sites right on the doorstop of beautiful Onkaparinga Gorge – bring a hammer for tent pegs.’ – Alex Doudy

‘Convenient, nature-based camping in a world-class location’ – Ryan Locke

‘Great spot for camping just out of Adelaide – there’s rock climbing and hiking right there! Perfect for the family and close to home.’ – Emma Christensen

Can't believe such a great spot and such a beautiful gorge is so close. Bring heavy pegs and a hammer for your tent.– Lincoln Rothal

If you live in Adelaide, camping in Onkaparinga is a great option if it’s your first time – particularly because you won’t have to travel far. Check out our tips to get you started, including what to pack and how to be a courteous camper.

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