Para Wirra Conservation Park

  • Picnic Areas
  • Campfires Permitted
  • Caravan Sites
  • BBQ Facilities
  • Toilets
  • Camping
  • Disabled Toilets
  • Dogs on Lead
  • Horse Riding
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
  • Cycling
PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Partial park closure

The old gold mining tramway tunnel and approach on the Phoenix Hike is closed until further notice for safety reasons. For any queries please contact 8523 7700.
Details >

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Para Wirra Conservation Park park locator map

With its extensive grassy areas, relaxing lakeside, and beautiful bush setting, Para Wirra Conservation Park is a well-loved gathering place for family and friends.

Tag your Instagram pics with #parawirraconservationpark to see them displayed on this page.

About

This is a perfect park for immersing yourself in nature – for walking, picnicking, and observing native animal life. The park is also home to the Barossa Goldfields, where you can discover the ruins and the history of a once thriving mining operation.

There are over 100 species of birds living in the park, including the cheeky emus you’ll see patrolling the picnic grounds. You can see kangaroos grazing at dawn and dusk, and on a warm day bearded dragons and sleepy lizards bask in the sunshine. If you’re in luck you might also spot a short-beaked echidna, a shy creature whose diggings can be found throughout the park. 

Opening hours

This park is open seven days a week from sunrise to sunset (the park is open 24 hours to campers via the Eastern gate entrance).

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resource Centre - Gawler

Phone: (+61 8) 8115 4600
Email: DEWNRPWOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

After hours Regional Duty Officer (for emergencies only): 0427 556 676

When to visit

Para Wirra Conservation Park is great at any time of year. The cooler weather is the best time to attempt the more challenging hikes and late winter through to spring the park comes alive with many wildflowers.

In the warmer months, the park is the perfect spot for picnics, barbecues or to take a leisurely stroll around the lake.  Visit the park early morning or late afternoon to make use of the cooler parts of the day.

Please be aware of fires or fire bans throughout the fire danger season and adjust your visit accordingly.

Accessibility

Parks are for all to enjoy, we would love to hear from you about your experience in nature. You can share your comments, pictures and videos with us and others by tagging @NationalParksSA on Facebook,  Instagram or email us.

Facilities 

Toilets

There are accessible toilets located at:

  • Gawler View Picnic Area
  • Wirra Picnic area
  • Hissey Picnic Area 1 accessible toilet (left hand) situated at the rear of the toilet block and accessed from the right-hand side path

See and do

Trails

Lake Discovery Loop (1km) – It is recommended to start from the East Lake carpark and follow the well-signposted trail in a clockwise direction. The trail loops around the lake on a hard packed gravel trail with a few slight rises that may require some assistance.

Dogs on a lead are also welcome.

Assistance dogs

Assistance dogs are permitted in most public places and are therefore welcome in South Australia’s parks and reserves. Assistance dogs must be appropriately restrained on a lead and remain under your effective control at all times while in a park or reserve.

As per the dogs in parks and reserves policy, if the dog is not an accredited assistance dog, they must be trained to assist a person with a disability to alleviate that disability and meet standards of hygiene and behaviour appropriate for a dog in a public place. However, refusal may be given if the person with the disability is unable to produce evidence the dog is an assistance dog with the appropriate training.

Before taking your assistance dog into a park that does not normally allow dogs, it is highly recommended that you contact us so we can provide you with the latest information on any potential hazards within specific parks that may affect your dog. Please contact the park via the contact details provided under the contact tab or call the information line on (+61 8) 8204 1910.

Dogs allowed (on lead)

Dogs are welcome in this park.

Please ensure you:

  • Keep your dog under control and on a lead no more than two metres in length.
  • Stick to designated walking trails.
  • Bring disposable bags to clean up your dog’s faeces (please be aware there are no bins in national parks).

Discover other parks you can walk your dog in on our find a park tool or read 12 dog-friendly walks in Adelaide Parks by Good Living for inspiration.

Facilities

Para Wirra Conservation Park is a perfect spot for group and family gatherings, with accessible facilities in a natural bushland setting. The lake is one of the park’s most popular places, there’s a barbecue area and picnic tables with a view out over the water. On a calm day, you’ll see the surrounding bushland reflected in the water with mirror-like perfection. 

The Gawler View picnic area is a large, open recreation space with a beautifully constructed Nature Play Forest set amongst the blue gums.  Free barbecues, picnic tables, shelters, a bush oval and toilets with accessible access are provided.

The Wirra campground has sites for tents, small camper trailers, campervans and caravans with bookings to be made online. If you have a large group please use the school groups booking form.  Facilities within the campground include free barbecues, a basic camp kitchen and accessible toilets.

The Para Wirra Resource Centre is available for hire and includes access to a small kitchen. The centre is a great location to hold small meetings for community and business groups.

Please note that the water at the campground and picnic areas is not treated, please ensure you bring enough drinking water with you for your visit.

Useful information

  • Mobile phone coverage can be patchy and unreliable in this park, especially if you are in low-lying areas.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Take a virtual tour

Take a virtual tour of this park. Get a taste for the various historic sites, the lake and the panoramic views which you will be rewarded with whilst walking within the park .

Pests and diseases

Phytophthora (fy-TOFF-thora), otherwise known as root-rot fungus, is killing our native plants and threatens the survival of animals depending on plants for food and shelter.

This introduced fungus can be found in plant roots, soil and water. Help stop the spread by using hygiene stations, staying on tracks and trails and by complying with all Phytophthora management signs.

Traditional owners

The three nations connected to Para Wirra are the Peramangk, Ngadjuri and Kaurna nations. Tapering gradually to meet the Barossa Valley and the mallee plains, the rugged Mount Lofty Ranges and South Para River form a natural meeting place for the Kaurna people across the Adelaide plains; the Peramangk people to the east; and the Ngadjuri people to the north.

Translated from the Kaurna language, ‘Para’ (really Pari) means river, creek or gully. ‘Wirra’ means forest. So Para Wirra is the forest where a waterway (river or creek) flows. Today, Para Wirra Conservation Park is an important area for all three nations, and National Parks are working with them to develop and promote cultural interpretation of the park.

Aboriginal peoples have occupied, enjoyed and managed the lands and waters of this State for thousands of generations. For Aboriginal first nations, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

There are many places across the State that have great spiritual significance to Aboriginal first nations.  At some of these places Aboriginal cultural protocols, such as restricted access, are promoted and visitors are asked to respect the wishes of Traditional Owners.

In places where protocols are not promoted visitors are asked to show respect by not touching or removing anything, and make sure you take all your rubbish with you when you leave.

Aboriginal peoples continue to play an active role in caring for their Country, including in parks across South Australia. 

European history

Barossa Goldfields

Gold was discovered here in the 1860s and although a number of mining syndicates invested heavily, they did not make their fortunes. Small scale mining continued in the area until the mid-1930s and many remains of mining activity can be seen throughout the northern end of the park. 

Stop in at the quaint Bowden Cottage Museum to learn about the gold mines and the challenging lives of those who worked in them. The cottage is open most Tuesdays and the third Sunday of every second month by the Barossa Goldfields Historical Society volunteers.

Geology

The Geology of the Para Wirra Conservation Park provides evidence of a long and dynamic history, involving deposition, deep burial, metamorphism and folding and subsequently uplift and faulting. This history began with the development of the Barossa Inlier about 1600 million years ago. After a period of erosion between 850-550 Million years ago, in a basin deposition occurred. The sediments were then buried to a depth of 10 km, and subjected to folding and faulting, resulting in gold mineralisation. From this time to the present a period of erosion and uplift occurred bringing the rocks to the surface.

See and do

Rangers recommend

We have picked the brains of our park rangers to find out what they would recommend you see and do whilst visiting this park.

  • Take a hike! There's a walk to suit everyone, whether it is a leisurely stroll on the Lake Discovery Loop, a hike through the spectacular gorges on the Devil’s Nose Hike or embarking on the South Para Grand Hike.
  • Have a picnic at Gawler View and enjoying the Nature Play Forest with the young ones. Afterwards, take a family hike along the Lizard Rock Hike.

  • Learn about the fascinating history of the Barossa Goldfields as you walk through a once thriving gold mining area.

  • Visit the quaint Bowden Cottage Museum to learn even more about the gold mines and the challenging lives of those who worked them.

  • Play a game of cricket or football on the bush oval, then cooking a barbecue at the Gawler View picnic area.

  • Walk your dog (on a lead) around the shores of the lake. This is particularly beautiful in the early morning and in the evenings before sunset.

  • Find your own spot along a trail within the park and photograph the different seasons, discover the changing landscape throughout the year

  • Visit the park in spring and take a walk along the many native wildflower-lined trails. Keep an eye out for native orchids that bloom this time of year.

  • Enjoy a breakfast barbecue by the Lake at sunrise and watch the birdlife flourish.

  • Spend a night under the stars at the Wirra campground, one of the closest camping spots to metro Adelaide.  Be sure to bring a good torch to look for wildlife active at night.

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. Please ensure that you are well equipped with food, water, sun protection and sturdy shoes. Please note that in winter and spring the water levels of the South Para River can become quite high, making it challenging to cross in sections.

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. 

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Easy walks

No bushwalking experience is required. Trails are clearly sign posted. The track is a compacted surface and has gentle undulating sections, but may have minor tripping hazards, e.g leaf litter and loose gravel.

  • Lake Discovery Walk (30 mins. 1km)

    This popular short trail is great for families where you can soak up the tranquil setting of Para Wirra's lake. You're sure to see many waterbirds and bush birds along the way, so bring your binoculars. Great in the morning and late afternoon.

  • Gawler View Nature Loop (30 mins. 1km)

    Explore the Nature Play Forest shared-use paths through the Gawler View picnic area. Keep your eyes peeled for bush birds, scurrying lizards and maybe even an emu or kangaroo. Suitable for prams. Some limited mobility access may be possible if assisted.

Moderate hikes

Suitable for most ages and fitness levels. Trails are sign posted. Some bush walking experience is recommended. Tracks may have some steep hill sections, rough surfaces that can be slippery after rain and steps or tripping hazards.

  • Victoria Hill Circuit Hike(45 mins, 1.5km anticlockwise loop)

    Discover the secrets of this historical mining town in the Barossa Valley. Allow time to stop and read the interpretive signs along the route that tell the colourful story of the Barossa Goldfields. Keep to trail at all times as there are dangerous mine shafts in the area.

    Access: car park on Allendale Road near Bowden Cottage.

  • Phoenix Circuit Hike (2 hrs 30 mins, 5km anticlockwise loop)

    Take a walk through time, passing the major mines of the Barossa Goldfields. Follow the pickaxe symbols every 200 metres, reading the stories of early miners on interpretive signs along the way. Discover the old tramway tracks from Menzies Mine, near the Battery. Keep to trail at all times as there are dangerous mine shafts in the area.

    Access: car park on Allendale Road near Bowden Cottage.

  • Lady Pearce Circuit Hike (4 hrs, 5km anticlockwise loop)

    A superb walk going down, but a solid climb back up. Hike through the old Barossa Goldfields and down to the Battery site. Take in the serenity of the South Para River before rock-hopping across the river. Climb out of the gorge along a dramatic spur. Keep to trail at all times as there are dangerous mine shafts in the area.

    Access: car park on Allendale Road near Bowden Cottage.

  • Scenic Loop (2 hrs, 4.5km return or 1 hr 30 mins, 3.2km loop)

    Whether you walk or ride to The Knob you’ll find yourself immersed in valleys of bushland surrounded by high hills, miles away from city life. Follow the shared use Knob Lookout Track down to the small rounded hill of the Knob. Return along the same track or Scenic Drive. Alternatively, return along a section of the South Para Grand and Lizard Rock hikes.
    The Scenic Drive section is a shared zone with vehicles.

    Access: Gawler View Picnic Area

  • Lizard Rock Hike (45 mins, 1.6km return)

    An enjoyable loop trail with easy grades and picturesque views across Wild Dog Creek valley. Explore the rock formations along the ridge and see if you can spot the Lizard Rock! Great for family groups. For safety, please supervise children near rocky outcrops.

    Access: near the Gawler View Barbecue and Natureplay areas.

    Lizard Rock Hike brochure

  • Hissey Hike (1 hour, 2km anticlockwise loop)

    Walk along the shaded valley of Wild Dog Creek and take in the scenery as you meander around the tranquil Lake. Ideal for families or visitors with limited time.

    Access: near the lake access road (east side).

    Hissey Loop Hike brochure

  • Tree Creeper Loop (2 hrs, 5km)

    A delightful nature trail, great on its own, or as part of other trails in the Forestry SA network. Look for wildflowers year round and stop by the dam along Blue Gum Track to see the wildlife that comes to visit! The Para Wirra Drive section is a shared zone with vehicles.

    Access: Wild Dog Creek car park, east of Para Wirra Drive and just south of Wirra Road.

  • Horseplay Trail (4 hrs, 8.5km)

    Enjoy 8.5 km of track around and through the Mack Creek section of the park that is available for hikers and horse riders.

    Access: Mack Creek car park, Humbug Scrub Road

Hard hikes

Bushwalking experience is recommended. Trails may be long with rough surfaces and very steep. Trail signage may be limited.

  • Devils Nose Hike (2 hrs, 4.4km)

    Take the ridge top walk to the Devils Nose Lookout. Sweeping views of the Barossa Range, Gawler District, South Para Gorge and Misery Farm will take your breath away. Bring your camera! For safety, please supervise children near rocky outcrops. Trail can be started from either the Lake or Devils Nose car parks.

    Access: car park and trailhead west of the lake.

  • South Para Grand Hike (4.5 hrs, 10km clockwise loop)

    See all the scenic highlights of central Para Wirra , this hike is best hiked in a clockwise direction. If you start from Hissey Picnic Area, you’ll first pass the Lake, then onto the Devil’s nose for spectacular views. From there head down into South Para Gorge, before winding back up to the Knob Lookout. Finally, discover the amazing Lizard and Chimney rocks.

    Access: Car park at Hissey Picnic Area

  • Mack Creek Hike (4 hrs, 7.5km)

    Follows Mack Creek downstream through a valley of magnificent river red gums. Look out for the beautiful orchids flowering in late winter and spring.

    Access: car park on Humbug Scrub Road

Camping

Wirra campground 

Situated at the eastern end of the park, in amongst the pink gums, grass trees and hop bush this brand new campground has 19 campsites, including six that are suitable for small campervans, camper trailers and caravans, a toilet (including disabled access), a basic camp kitchen, gas barbecues and fire pits in each camp site for use outside the fire ban season.

Click through to the booking page for campsite descriptions and pictures

Book online

Book online to reserve your campsite up to 12 months in advance.

FAQs about booking online

Book and pay in person

If you are unable to book and pay online you can do so, in person, at these booking agents across the state.

Accessibility information

Most of the campsites are wheelchair accessible, they are on flat ground with a compacted gravel surface. The toilet facilities are wheelchair accessible, with a 900mm door width and a fixed handrail alongside the toilet.

Important Information:

  • Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. In order to use the fire pits at Wirra Campground you will need to bring your own wood.
  • If you have a large group please call the Natural Resources Centre - Gawler on (+61 8) 8115 4600 or email DEWNRPWOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au.
  • Community and recreation organisations, school groups and scouts can arrange special 'camp-over' activities at one of the open spaces by appointment with a ranger (conditions apply).

Mountain biking

Explore the Blue Gum, Long-Leaf Box woodlands and shining Grass tree communities of Para Wirra by bike and on foot by using the parks newly established shared-use trails.

The specially designated shared-use trails allow families to explore the park at an easy pace. They also provide links to the most popular features of the park, including The Lake, Nature Play Forest at Gawler View, picnic areas, The Knob Lookout and Wirra Campground.

The trails listed below are popular suggested routes. However you may also ride on the park roads and the fire tracks. Cycling is only permitted on trails and tracks designated for that activity.

Please obey signs, including sections where walking or cycling is not permitted. Observing the classification system will help ensure you select trails suitable to your ability.

Easy trails 

Most suitable for children, families or novices with a basic level of skill and fitness. Fire tracks or wide single tracks with a gentle grade and a relatively obstacle free, hardened surface.

  • Gawler View Nature Loop - (1km loop)

    Slowly ride along paths around the Gawler View picnic area. A trail for junior riders. Don’t forget to hop off your bike and jump puddles, climb a tree or look for animal tracks.
  • Lake Discovery Loop - (1km loop)

    This short loop is a slow riding zone, suitable for young riders and beginners. A popular trail that is great for families. Soak up the tranquil setting of Para Wirra’s lake. You’re sure to see many waterbirds and bush birds along the way,so bring your binoculars. Great in the morning and late afternoon. This trail is for slow riding only and please supervise children near the lake.

Intermediate trails

 

Most suitable for riders with a moderate level of skill and fitness. A combination of public roads and/or management tracks with obstacles (such as fallen branches), variable surface, and a moderate slope.

  • Scenic Loop - (4.5km loop)

    Whether you ride or drive to The Knob you’ll find yourself immersed in valleys of bushland surrounded by high hills, milesaway from city life. You can also access the steep Quarry Track before you get to the top of The Knob, which you can ride all the way to the South Para River. 

  • Tree Creeper Loop - (5km loop)

    A delightful nature trail, great on its own, or as part of other trails in the Forestry SA network. Look for wildflowers year round and stop by the dam along Blue Gum Track to see the wildlife that comes to visit!

  • Pink Gum Track - (1.5km return)

    This track passes through pink gum woodland and links Wirra Road, Wirra Campground and Humbug Scrub Road.

  • Wild Dog Track - (700m return)

    This is a short spur track that heads down to Wild Dog Dam. Sit quietly and you are likely to spot plenty of wildlife at this local waterhole.

Horse riding

Take your horse for a ride along unspoiled bush tracks in the southern end of the park at Mack Creek. There are two entry points off Humbug Scrub Road, one with a car park area large enough to turn a horse float around. The Horseplay trail detailed below incorporates the boundary track of the Mack Creek area as well as the ruins track that crosses Mack Creek. This section of the park is part of the shared use trails for horses and walkers only.

Please note that horses are not allowed on the walking trail along Mack Creek.

  • Horseplay Trail - (8.5km loop)

  • Enjoy 8.5km of track around and through the Mack Creek section of the park this is available for hikers and horse riders

Phytophthora cinnamomi disease

Phytophthora dieback is killing many native plant species, and threatens the survival of animals depending on plants for food and shelter. Horses and riders can spread the disease through plant material that sticks to hooves, boots, bandages or boot covers.

Barossa goldfields

Gold was discovered here in the 1860s and although a number of mining syndicates invested heavily, they did not make their fortunes. Small scale mining continued in the area until the mid-1930s and many remains of mining activity can be seen throughout the northern end of the park. 

Interpretative walks of the Barossa goldfields take you past many points of interest, and you can visit Bowden Cottage, a museum run by the Barossa Goldfields Historical Society dedicated to the goldmining days. 

Please note that fossicking is not permitted in Para Wirra Conservation Park.

Birdwatching

Para Wirra Conservation Park can be a noisy place. You'll hear the raucous cries of wattlebirds when the gums and wattles are flowering and see families of white winged choughs digging for roots and grubs. You’ll hear the strange and unique drumming sound emus make as they wander through the picnic grounds (watch out for your food or they will try to steal it from you, and please do not feed them). The smaller birds, like the scarlet robin, blue wren and eastern spine bill, make their busy rustling noises as they go about their business closer to the ground.

Barbecues and picnics

Para Wirra Conservation Park is a perfect spot for group and family gatherings, with accessible facilities in a natural bushland setting. The lake is one of the park’s most popular areas, there’s a barbecue area and picnic tables with a view out over the water. On a calm day you’ll see the surrounding bushland reflected in the water with mirror-like perfection. 

The Gawler View picnic area is a large, open recreation space with an oval and a flat grassy area near the barbeques. There are shelters, accessible toilets and Nature Play Forest for kids of all ages. The Wirra campground area has free barbecues and accessible toilets.

Teach and learn

If you are looking to visit Parra Wirra for educational purposes, you might like to peruse our Educational Pack tailored to Para Wirra Conservation Park. This pack was developed for schools and families by park rangers and the Natural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges’ NRM Education team.

Volunteering

 

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

  • Keep to defined tracks and trails – this is particularly important in the northern area of the park where there may be unfenced goldmine shafts. 
  • Always leave yourself plenty of time, particularly when walking down from the Goldfields area into the main body of the park. The return walk is very steep.
  • Pay attention to the weather. Be extra careful in wet or extreme weather conditions, particularly when crossing the South Para River ford.
  • Wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen. Make sure you have appropriate wet weather clothing.
  • Carry enough food and drinking water to be self-sufficient. The hotter the conditions, the more water you will need.
  • Do not rely on tanks or creeks in the park for drinking water.
  • Carry a map of the park and the walks at all times.
  • If you’re planning a long walk, you should inform an emergency contact person who will know if you don’t return at the designated time.

Fire

This park is situated in a CFS Bushfire Prone Area.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

  • Wood and solid fuel fires are prohibited during Fire Danger Season, which may run between October and May.
  • Gas fires are permitted in designated areas only (other than on days of total fire ban).
  • A number of gas barbecues are available throughout the park, or you may bring your own gas barbecue.
  • On some total fire ban days the park may remain open, but the use of all barbecues is prohibited.

Water

Please do not swim or bathe in the lake, there are submerged objects just under the water and it can be unsafe.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • keep your dog on a lead at all times and check if there are areas of the park where dogs are not allowed
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Camping

When camping in a National Park, it's important to remember the following:

  • Always let someone responsible know your travel plans, especially when travelling in remote areas. It's a good idea to let them know when you expect to return.
  • Check the weather forecast before you leave, including overnight temperatures on the Bureau of Meteorology. Even during very mild weather, the nights can get very cold. 
  • The quality and quantity of water cannot be guaranteed within parks. Please bring plenty of water and food to be self-sufficient.
  • Always camp in designated sites (where applicable) - do not camp beneath trees with overhanging branches, as they can drop without warning. It's also a good idea to check that there no insect nests nearby.
  • Check to make sure you're not camping in a natural waterway, flash floods can happen anytime.
  • If camp fires are permitted, you must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. Extinguish your camp fire with water (not sand or dirt) until the hissing sound stops.
  • Ensure that you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Dogs

Why does my dog need to be on a lead?

If your dog is off lead, it is more likely to impact on native wildlife and other visitors in a park and be at risk itself.

Risks to wildlife:

  • Dogs off tracks will leave a scent in the bush that will keep wildlife away.
  • Uncontrolled dogs may frighten wildlife and disrupt their natural behaviour.
  • Some dogs will kill or injure wildlife.

Risks to other park visitors

  • Dogs may be aggressive to other park visitors.
  • Even friendly dogs can knock people over causing injury.
  • Some people want to enjoy parks without dogs.

Risks to your dog

  • Poison baits may be laid to control foxes. Baits can be fatal to dogs.
  • Even if your dog is friendly, other dogs may not be.
  • Your dog can catch parasites (such as fleas and ticks) from wildlife.
  • Snake bites are a real risk in natural areas such as parks.
  • Wildlife such as kangaroos and koalas will defend themselves if threatened by a dog and can cause significant injury to or the death of your dog.

Maps

Parks maps

Campground maps

Maps on your mobile

If you have a smartphone or tablet you can download the free Avenza PDF Map app and have interactive national park maps on hand when you need them.

The app uses your device's built-in GPS to plot your real-time location within the park onto a map. The app can be used without a network connection and without roaming charges. You can also measure area and distance, plot photos and drop placemark pins. 

How to get it working on your device:

1. Download the Avenza PDF maps app from the app store whilst you are still in range (its free!).
2. Open up the app and click the shopping cart icon.
3. Click ‘Find’ and type the name of the national park or reserve you are looking for.
4. Click on the map you are after and install it (all our maps are free).
5. You will now find a list of your installed maps on the home page of the Avenza app.
6. Use our maps through the Avenza PDF map app while in the park and never take a wrong turn again.

Fees

Entry fees

Enjoy FREE vehicle entry during the month of May to celebrate Para Wirra as Park of the Month.

Please pay your vehicle entry fee prior to arrival as self-registration stations are no longer available in this park.

Fees collected are used for conservation and to maintain and improve park facilities.

Where can I book and pay in person?

If you are unable to book and pay online you can do so, in person, at these booking agents across the state.

For online bookings enquiries please email:

DEWNR.AMLRGawlerOffice@sa.gov.au

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Campsites need to be booked prior to arrival.

Click through to the online booking page for more details about individual campgrounds and fees.

Book online

Book online to reserve your campsite up to 12 months in advance.

FAQs about booking online

Book and pay in person

If you are unable to book and pay online you can do so, in person, at these booking agents across the state.

For online bookings enquiries please email:

DEWNRPWOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Large group bookings 

Community and recreation organisations, school groups and Scouts can arrange special 'camp-over' activities at one of the open spaces by appointment with a ranger (conditions apply). Contact the Natural Resources Centre - Gawler for more information on (+61 8) 8115 4600.

Park pass

If you intend to visit often, you may like to purchase any of the below park passes.

Single Park Pass

Is this your favourite park? If you visit often, it's more economical to purchase a Single Park Pass giving you vehicle entry to this park for 12 months. 

There are 12 parks that are part of the Single Park Pass system.  

Holiday Park Pass and Multi Park Pass

Want to explore SA’s parks all year round? Purchase a Multi Park Pass (12 months), or a Holiday Park Pass (for 2 months) which entitles you to vehicle entry not just for this park, but up to an additional 10 parks as well!

Other fees and permits

Para Wirra Resource Centre

Full day hire: $47.00

For bookings and enquiries please call the Para Wirra Conservation Park: (+61 8) 8280 7048

If the phone is unattended, leave a message and the ranger will get back to you. 

Group Visits

If you are planning to visit the park with a large group please call in advance. With notice we can make sure the park is sufficiently staffed for your visit.

Phone: (+61 8) 8523 7700

PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Partial park closure

The old gold mining tramway tunnel and approach on the Phoenix Hike is closed until further notice for safety reasons. For any queries please contact 8523 7700.
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