Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

  • Picnic Areas
  • Toilets
  • Dogs on Lead
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
  • Cycling
PDF Park Brochure
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Cobbler Creek Recreation Park state map

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park is an oasis of calm in the suburbs. The park conserves some of Adelaide’s rare woodland and grassland habitats, and is also one of Adelaide’s popular mountain biking spots.

Tag your Instagram pics with #cobblercreekrecreationpark to see them displayed on this page.

About

Nestled between Golden Grove and Salisbury, this park is a fantastic introduction to the bush, a peaceful place to unwind from city life, a popular destination for walkers, and an adventure for budding mountain bike riders.

Is mountain biking your thing? These purpose-built trails are perfect for beginner and intermediate riders, with a couple of sections that will give even the most experienced of riders a thrill. You can even take the kids for a pedal on the ‘pump track’ while you show of your skills on the bike jumps.

Get your friends and family together for a BBQ picnic and let the kids explore the Kites and Kestrels adventure playground. This exiting playground includes a flying fox and climbing structures inspired by tree-top raptor nests!

If you’re looking for a more tranquil escape, the trails take you through peaceful River Red Gum lined creeks, woodlands echoing with bird calls, and ridge tops with views across the Adelaide plains.

Opening hours

This park is open seven days a week from sunrise to sunset (except Christmas Day).

It is recommended that you visit during daylight hours. The car park off Bridge Road and Smith Road is open from sunrise to sunset.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resource Centre - Gawler

Phone: (+61 8) 8523 7700
Email: DEWNR.AMLRGawlerOffice@sa.gov.au

When to visit

Cobbler Creek has something to offer almost all year round. In the autumn, the pink and white garland lilies bloom across the park, while in spring and winter the park’s native grasses flourish and you should see lots of wildlife.

Riding and walking is perfect at any time when the trails are dry, but please take care in extreme conditions like heat or rain. In wet weather, there is a risk of flooding upstream of the Cobbler Creek dam at the western end of the park. 

Getting there

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park is just 19km north of Adelaide, between the suburbs of Salisbury and Golden Grove. The main entry and car park is at the corner of Bridge and Smith Roads, Salisbury East. Access to both sides of the park can be found either side of The Grove Way, but be mindful of traffic as you enter and leave.

If you're in your own vehicle, you can find this park on the map.

There is also public transport to this park from the Adelaide city centre. 

Pets in parks

You and your dog can enjoy this park provided you stay on the designated walking trails.

You must keep your dog on a lead and under your control at all times. Don't forget to bring your disposable 'doggie-doo' bag to clean up after your dog.

Pets are not permitted in other areas of the park.

Facilities

We’ve just finished spending $1m on new visitor facilities in the Smith and Bridge roads precinct of the park, including:

  • The exciting new Kites and Kestrels adventure playground, which has climbing structures that look like trees with raptors’ nests, sandpits, a flying fox and other great play equipment.
  • Shelters with seating and a barbecue, grassy areas for picnics and lots of shrubs and trees for shade (located near the main entrance off Bridge Road, Salisbury).
  • A new car park.
  • Public toilets and drinking fountains.
  • New tracks for bike riders, including a ‘pump track’ suitable for most skill levels and a jumps track with a range of features to cater for different skill levels.
  • There are various park benches scattered around the park where you can catch your breath, or simply take in the view.
  • Park maps

Find out more about exiting new developments in our parks.

Useful information

Pests and diseases

Coolatai grass is an aggressive and invasive weed that is present in the park. DEWNR and local councils are working to prevent the spread of this weed. You can help by checking and removing all seeds and mud from your clothing, bicycles and dogs prior to leaving the park. 

Traditional owners

This park, and surrounding hills is a significant place for the Kaurna people, who historically used this area in winter as makeshift Wardli (shelter). 

Many Kaurna yarta (land) family groups look after the Kaurna pangkara (country), which stretched from the plains and hills south of Crystal Brook and west of Mount Lofty, down to Cape Jervis.

While the Kaurna people sheltered in this area they gathered and hunted the necessities for survival to sustain their family groups including:

  • Mai (bush vegetables)
  • Pardu (bush meats from animals)
  • Mintirninthi (healing) and
  • Bush ‘textiles’ which were used to make woven products for gathering bush fruit and vegetables.

Go for a walk along the Mai Tappa Trail using the brochure to interpret the Kaurna ‘food pathway’, and learn about Kaurna history and living culture.

Aboriginal South Australians are the first peoples of our State and have occupied, enjoyed and managed these lands and waters since the creation. For SA's First Peoples, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

Aboriginal peoples' oral histories and creation stories traverse the length and breadth of Australia’s lands and waters, including South Australian Parks. These stories interconnect land and waters with complex meaning and values and hold great cultural significance. We recognise and respect Aboriginal people's ownership of their stories and that they hold rights and obligations to care for Country. It is through these rights and cultural obligations and a shared goal to protect the environment for generations to come that DEWNR is committed to meaningful collaboration and involvement with Aboriginal peoples in the management of our shared parks.

History

Cobbler Creek was named after a shoemaker (or a cobbler, as they were called then) who farmed the land in the late 1800s. You can still see the ruins of his homestead ‘Trevalsa’ in the north-west of the park, along with other relics of early colonial life.

This park was proclaimed in 1982.

See and do

Rangers recommend

We have picked the brains of our park rangers to find out what they would recommend you see and do whilst visiting this park.

  • Mix it up on the bike trails and explore the network of connected tracks until you find the perfect blend of challenge and buzz.
  • Bushwalkers can discover the Mai Tappa hike, Kaurna for 'food pathway', that takes you through the mallee box grassy woodland, stands of quandong and native apricots, down into a creek bed, across grassy plains, and past an old quarry.
  • Relax on one of the many benches you’ll find around the park, take time to watch the birds whilst looking out over valleys, the city, and the sea.

Bushwalking

The park’s designated trails are suggested routes only. Create your own route by mixing the designated trails with the connector tracks which can be found in the park trail maps. Please obey signs, particularly where hiking or cycling is not permitted.

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. 

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Easy walks

  • Beginners' circuit (250m loop)

    Close to the picnic area, this easy trail is ideal for children learning to ride.

  • Easy Does It circuit (250m loop)

    Another easy trail near the picnic area, designed to help children become familiar with minor undulations and can be linked with the Beginners Circuit too.

  • KARNARFA circuit (1.5km loop)

    For riders taking the next step to riding in natural areas. This trail features a gravel surface with many easy (but optional) trail obstacles and features. Once you have mastered this trail you will be ready to venture onto some of the intermediate trails in the wider park.

Moderate hikes

  • Mai Tappa Circuit (2.2km loop)

    An interesting hike through the endangered mallee box grassy woodland. This hike is a Kaurna mai tappa, or 'food pathway'.  

    Descend into gullies to walk along a creek line then climb hills for great views out over Kaurna country. 

    Please note that Mai Tappa Circuit is walking only – no bikes are permitted.

    Download the interpretive Mai Tappa Circuit brochure to take it with you as you walk.

Hard hikes

  • Porosa Hike (3km)

    This trail takes a tranquil path through the valley of Cobbler Creek. There are moderate climbs through sections of mallee box grassy woodland where you should see lots of birds. Great views can be seen of the Adelaide Hills and surrounding plains from the hilltop near Teakle Ruins. This trail is best suited to hikers.

    A section of this hike (north of Cobbler Creek) is walking only, there is an alternative cycling trail south of Cobbler Creek. Please obey the signs.

  • Valley Circuit (4km loop)

    The Valley Circuit takes you to some of the more remote areas of the park. Recommended for the experienced hiker and the mountain bike rider seeking adventure.

  • Ruins Loop (3km loop)

    This is the fun way to explore the ruins in the park. Ride in a clockwise direction to enjoy the exciting descent back down the hill. Walkers need to be alert to bikes on this shared use trail and bikers remember that walkers have right the of way.

  • Babbler Loop (3km loop)

    On bike or foot, you'll climb to the top of the park through rare mallee box grassy woodland, weeping pittosporum and christmas bush. Great views of Salisbury and Gulf St Vincent and a great place to watch the late afternoon sun sink below the horizon.

  • Short and Sweet (1.7km)

    Best for bike riders, this is an exciting trail packed with lots of challenges and features for the experienced mountain bike rider. Walkers need to be alert to bikes when on this shared use trail and bikers remember that walkers have right of way.

Kites and Kestrels Playspace and picnic area

For a fun-filled day out, get your family together to visit this playspace located near the main entrance on Smith Road.

The playspace design was inspired by the kites and kestrels that fly overhead, and features BBQs, picnic shelters, toilets and a bike pump track.

Sandpits have been designed to look like bird nests with giant eggs in the middle, and there’s a flying fox and traditional play equipment to enjoy as well.

Get a birds-eye view of the playground from the raptor-themed climbing structures that mimic tree nests.

Please supervise your child’s play, exercising caution around the metal play equipment on hot days.

Mountain biking

You can ride your bike on public roads and any specific cycling trails and tracks on offer in this park. 

Please obey signs and use the trail classifications and descriptions, where available, to select trails suitable to your ability. Many trails are shared, so always keep an eye out for others. Generally, cyclists give way to pedestrians. Please be considerate of all trail users at all times.

The park’s designated trails are suggested routes only. Create your own route by mixing the designated trails with the connector tracks.

Learn more about cycling in SA's parks, including other parks offering cycle tracks, trail classification and read the trail user code of practice for important points to remember when planning your bike ride.

Easy

  • Pump track

  • A great place for beginner to advanced riders to hone their riding skills. Pump tracks teach body positioning, cornering and jumping techniques. How many laps can you do without pedalling?

  • Beginners' circuit (250m loop)

    Close to the picnic area, this easy trail is ideal for children learning to ride.

  • Easy Does It circuit (250m loop)

    Another easy trail near the picnic area, designed to help children become familiar with minor undulations and can be linked with the Beginners Circuit too.

  • KAFNARFA circuit (1.2km loop)

    For riders taking the next step to riding in natural areas. This trail features a gravel surface with many easy (but optional) trail obstacles and features. Once you have mastered this trail you will be ready to venture onto some of the intermediate trails in the wider park.

Intermediate

  • Intermediate Jump Trail  

  • One way downhill, descending only. No walking permitted. The gentle slope along this trail allows riders to carry enough speed to make the tabletop jumps fun to roll over, or to build confidence to get the wheels off the ground. Small drops encourage riders to keep their weight back. Veer left at the first fork in the trail.
  • Porosa Hike (3km)

    This trail takes a tranquil path through the valley of Cobbler Creek. There are moderate climbs through sections of mallee box grassy woodland where you should see lots of birds. Great views can be seen of the Adelaide Hills and surrounding plains from the hilltop near Teakle Ruins. This trail is best suited to hikers.

    A section of this hike (north of Cobbler Creek) is walking only, there is an alternative cycling trail south of Cobbler Creek. Please obey the signs.

  • Valley Circuit (4km loop)

    The Valley Circuit takes you to some of the more remote areas of the park. Recommended for the experienced hiker and the mountain bike rider seeking adventure.

  • Ruins Loop (3km loop)

    This is the fun way to explore the ruins in the park. Ride in a clockwise direction to enjoy the exciting descent back down the hill. Walkers need to be alert to bikes on this shared use trail and bikers remember that walkers have right of way.

  • Babbler Loop (3km loop)

    On bike or foot, you'll climb to the top of the park through rare mallee box grassy woodland, weeping pittosporum and christmas bush. Great views of Salisbury and the Gulf St Vincent and a great place to watch the late afternoon sun sink below the horizon.

  • Short and Sweet (1.7km)

    Best for bike riders, this is an exciting trail packed with lots of challenges and features for the experienced mountain bike rider. Walkers need to be alert to bikes when on this shared use trail and bikers remember that walkers have right of way.

  • Woodlands Connector

  • The Woodlands Connector meanders through quality mallee box grassy woodland and connects with entrances along Green Valley Drive.

Advanced

  • Advanced Jump Trail

    One way downhill, descending only. No walking permitted. Veering right at the first fork and left at the second fork will take riders over larger drops, doubles and tabletops. Suitable for a higher level of confidence and skill.

  • Northern Downhill

    One way downhill, descending only. No walking permitted. The Northern Downhill Trail has a great variety of features including jumps, drop offs and technical terrain.

  • Valley Downhill

    One way downhill, descending only. No walking permitted. The Valley Downhill Trail makes great use of the lay of the land and zig zags its way down the valley with steep banking corners and fun little drop offs.

Extremely Advanced

  • Extremely Advanced Jump Trail

  • One way downhill, descending only. No walking permitted. Veering right at the first and second fork will bring riders to the large fixed features, including flat and lipped launches, a whale-tail, and a wall-ride. Suitable for highly confident and experienced rider only, this trail includes large unavoidable drop and gaps.

Stay in the park

Camping is not permitted within this park.

Flora

Cobbler Creek contains the largest remaining stand of the endangered mallee box grassy woodland on the Adelaide plains, making it an important conservation area. This area also contains iron-grass species and a variety of native perennial grasses, including brush wire grass, kangaroo grass, spear grasses and wallaby grasses.

Fauna

Past land use such as grazing and cropping have had an impact on the diversity of native wildlife in the area, and now this park is an important refuge for threatened woodland birds in Adelaide. Be on the look out for the golden whistlers, tawny frog-mouths, grey-shrike thrush and the occasional brown falcon in the valley as you walk beside the Cobbler Creek. See other birds of prey such as the Australian kestrel and black-shouldered kite, as they soar the skies and scour the grasslands for mice and lizards. 

Volunteering

 

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

Ensure that you:

  • when hiking, wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • make sure you have appropriate weather proof clothing
  • carry enough water to be self-sufficient
  • please be respectful of other users at all times
  • stay on the designated trails and connector tracks for your own safety, and prevent the spread of declared weeds to other areas in the park
  • ensure someone knows your approximate location and expected time of return
  • take appropriate maps.
  • Walk, hike or trek - what's the difference?

Mountain biking

To protect the surrounding environment and to ensure the safety of all riders and shared trail users, please be aware of the international Trail Users Code of Practice when using shared trails. Important points to remember include:

  • plan your ride
  • comply with all signs
  • ride only on formed tracks/trails
  • share the trail - obey give way rules
  • avoid riding in wet, muddy conditions
  • ride lightly and leave no trace or rubbish
  • control your bike within your limits
  • clean your bike to avoid the spread of weeds or plant diseases
  • carry sufficient food and drinking water
  • respect the rights of others
  • tell others about the code.

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires, gas fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited throughout the year.
  • Ensure you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Park maps

Maps on your mobile

If you have a smartphone or tablet you can download the free Avenza PDF Map app and have interactive national park maps on hand when you need them.

The app uses your device's built-in GPS to plot your real-time location within the park onto a map. The app can be used without a network connection and without roaming charges. You can also measure area and distance, plot photos and drop placemark pins. 

How to get it working on your device:

1. Download the Avenza PDF maps app from the app store whilst you are still in range (its free!).
2. Open up the app and click the shopping cart icon.
3. Click ‘Find’ and type the name of the national park or reserve you are looking for.
4. Click on the map you are after and install it (all our maps are free).
5. You will now find a list of your installed maps on the home page of the Avenza app.
6. Use our maps through the Avenza PDF map app while in the park and never take a wrong turn again.

Fees

Entry fees

Come and enjoy this park for free. 

Park pass

This park is not included in the park pass system. 

Camping and accommodation

There is no camping or accommodation available within this park. 

Other fees and permits

There are no other fees or permits associated with this park. 

PDF Park Brochure