Ewens Ponds Conservation Park

  • Picnic Areas
  • Toilets
  • Disabled Toilets
  • Scuba / Snorkelling
PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Partial park closure

Part of Ewens Ponds Conservation Park will be closed from 6am on Monday 29 August 2016 until 6pm on Sunday 29 November 2016.
Details >

Photo by Jakin Manser
Ewens Ponds SA map

Snorkelling along the shallow channels or scuba diving in the spring-fed limestone ponds of Ewens Ponds Conservation Park are fantastic experiences for qualified divers. The depth and clarity of these ponds create a rare environment for plants and fish.

Ewens Ponds SA map

Snorkelling along the shallow channels or scuba diving in the spring-fed limestone ponds of Ewens Ponds Conservation Park are fantastic experiences for qualified divers. The depth and clarity of these ponds create a rare environment for plants and fish.

About

Discover the spring-fed limestone ponds at the Ewens Ponds Conservation Park by snorkelling along the shallow channels or scuba diving into the ponds.

The channels connect three basin-shaped ponds which are approximately 10 metres deep. The clarity of the water enables plants to grow underwater to a depth of about six metres. Some of these plants are not found growing fully submerged underwater anywhere else in the world.

Opening hours

Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resources Centre - Mount Gambier

Phone: (+61 8) 8735 1177

Getting there

Ewens Ponds Conservation Park is located 36km south of Mount Gambier. Access is via Port MacDonnell Road.

Pets in parks

Pets are not permitted within this park. There are however, a number of South Australian National Parks where you can take your dog on a lead. 

Facilities

There are picnic areas, toilets and disabled toilets located in this park.

Useful information

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Traditional owners

Aboriginal South Australians are the first peoples of our State and have occupied, enjoyed and managed these lands and waters since the creation. For SA's First Peoples, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

Aboriginal peoples' oral histories and creation stories traverse the length and breadth of Australia’s lands and waters, including South Australian Parks. These stories interconnect land and waters with complex meaning and values and hold great cultural significance. We recognise and respect Aboriginal people's ownership of their stories and that they hold rights and obligations to care for Country. It is through these rights and cultural obligations and a shared goal to protect the environment for generations to come that DEWNR is committed to meaningful collaboration and involvement with Aboriginal peoples in the management of our shared parks.

See and do

Bushwalking

There is currently no bushwalking information available for this park, please contact the park office for more information. 

Mountain biking

Mountain biking is currently not permitted in this park. 

Stay in the park

Camping is not permitted within this park.

Snorkelling and diving

Go snorkelling and diving in the ponds and come face to face with a variety of fish, ranging from the tiny, rare Ewens pygmy perch hiding among the reeds to the freshwater crayfish scuttling along the pond floor.

As the average water temperature is between 10-15 degrees, a wetsuit is highly recommended.

The minimum qualification for divers is open water.

Volunteering

If you think you might be interested in volunteering opportunities within this park please contact our Volunteer Support Unit.

Safety

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. 

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited throughout the year.
  • Gas fires are permitted, other than on days of total fire ban.
  • Ensure you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Water

As the average water temperature is between 10-15 degrees, a wetsuit is highly recommended.

Due to the cold water and potential for damage to the aquatic environment, recreational swimming, aside from diving and snorkelling, is not allowed.

The minimum qualification for divers is open water.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Fees

Entry fees

Come and enjoy this park for free. 

Park pass

This park is not included in the park pass system. 

Camping and accommodation

There is no camping or accommodation available within this park. 

Other fees and permits

Diving qualifications

The minimum qualification for divers is open water.