$3 million boost to revitalise private land conservation

Biodiversity in South Australia got $3 million boost earlier this month with the launch of a Heritage Agreements grants program by Minister for Environment and Water David Speirs at a Heritage Agreement at Macclesfield in the Adelaide Hills. 

Potential outcomes of the program is to improve native vegetation on private land to protect and enhance biodiversity

The Heritage Agreements grants program is a two-year round of funding that will help landholders and support farmers to improve their bushland and protect native vegetation and the species that depend on it, into the future. 

The grants program is the first dedicated funding for private land conservation in SA in six years, and is a vital opportunity to assist landholders in ‘back to basics’ land management on a practical level.

A great example of collaboration between the government and private landholders, the revamped grants program is and is being delivered by the Nature Foundation in partnership with Trees for Life, Conservation Council, Livestock SA and Nature Conservation Society.

The Heritage Agreement grants funding will be rolled out through two types of grants:

  • Small grants – up to $10,000
  • Large grants – more than $10,000.

The grants are only open to Heritage Agreement landholders. A Native Vegetation Heritage Agreement is a conservation area on private land, established between the landholder and the Minister for Environment and Water on recommendation of the Native Vegetation Council (NVC) that contributes to protecting and/or restoring indigenous biodiversity. 

To find out more visit: www.revitalisingconservationsa.org.au.

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A private land holder sign proudly displays where a heritage area is and how they are working collaboratively with DEW to help protect and improve our bushland (Photo credit Peter Hastwell)
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Minister for Environment and Water David Speirs is pictured on the right with Livestock SA CEO Andrew Curtis, Nature Foundation CEO Hugo Hopton and landholder Ned Schofield