Adelaide Botanic Garden Wine ready to taste

Date posted: 14 September 2016

Two limited edition wines made from grapes harvested from the vineyard straddling Adelaide Botanic Garden and the National Wine Centre are now available to the public.

Adelaide Botanic Garden 2016 Field Blend Rosé and Dry White are the results of a unique year-long collaboration between the Botanic Gardens of South Australia, the National Wine Centre and Jacob’s Creek Winemakers.

Adorning the wine bottles’ labels is the Victoria amazonica (Amazon Waterlily) – arguably Adelaide Botanic Garden’s most iconic resident.

This “jewel of the Amazon” – which was coveted by the Garden’s second director Richard Schomburgk and was displayed to the South Australian public for the first time in 1868 – fittingly only flowers for a limited time (changing colour from white to rose pink over 48 hours).

Botanic Gardens of South Australia Director Janice Goodwins said the two wines don’t just point to the state’s rich history and international reputation for winemaking, they told the story of plants and how they connect to our culture, industry and daily lives.

“Humans have been producing wine from fermented fruits for thousands of years and in more recent decades South Australia has become a global hub for its produce thanks to our highly skilled professionals and optimal climate,” Ms Goodwins said.

“Today marks a special day in what may be a world first collaboration – a wine produced solely from grapes grown at a botanic garden, which were tenderly maintained by a state-of-the-art wine centre, and produced with the support of some of the finest winemakers on the planet.”

National Wine Centre General Manager Adrian Emeny said the project had been an exciting first for the Centre and the fruitful partnership had produced wines rich with South Australian culture and heritage.

“We’re proud to have partnered with Adelaide Botanic Garden and Jacob’s Creek to produce a really unique product that will no doubt generate great interest from wine lovers,” Mr Emeny said.

Ben Bryant, Chief Winemaker at Jacob’s Creek, said, “Both wines were made as field blends, meaning we combined the different grape varieties as we harvested them and fermented them together.

“The result is a delightful white wine that is crisp and vibrant with delicious grapefruit and citrus aromas with hints of tropical fruit and passionfruit.  The Rosé is delicately floral on the nose with fresh berry fruit and a dry finish.”

A limited run of about 1,000 bottles (500 of the Rosé and 500 of the Dry White) has been produced, with the wine available for purchase at the National Wine Centre ($25 per bottle) and by the glass at Adelaide Botanic Garden’s Café Fibonacci ($7.50) from Thursday 15 September.

The partnership will produce a similar exclusive vintage from the vineyard each year until 2018.

The project is the Botanic Gardens second foray into producing a beverage from plants after Botanic Ale was produced from barley grown at Adelaide Botanic Garden’s City Crop in 2014.