Brookfield Conservation Park

  • Picnic Areas
  • Toilets
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
PDF Park Brochure
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Brookfield SA map

Home to the southern hairy-nosed wombat, Brookfield Conservation Park is managed by Conservation Volunteers Australia.

The gently undulating limestone country is ideal habitat for wombats, fat-tailed dunnarts and red kangaroos that share the park with prolific bird life, including the rare bush stone-curlew, ground cuckoo-shrikes and Australian owlet-nightjars

There are excellent opportunities for bushwalking, picnics and a self-guided nature drive in the park.

About

Brookfield Conservation Park is located near Blanchetown in the South Australia's riverland district. The park is home to a wide array of native wildlife, not only the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons), but also to species such as the Fat-tailed Dunnart, Common Dunnart, Red & Western Grey Kangaroos and Emus. 

These animals share the park with abundant bird life including the nationally vulnerable Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata), Australian Ringneck Parrots, Hooded Robins and Crested Bellbirds along with the rarer Stone Curlew, Ground Cuckoo Shrikes and Australian Owlet Nightjars.

The park is managed by Conservation Volunteers Australia.

Opening hours

The public section of Brookfield Conservation Park is open from 7am until sunset, 7 days a week.

This park is closed 4 times a year for feral animal control programs, see the alerts in the top right hand corner of this page for closure details.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resources Centre - Murray Bridge

Phone: (+61 8) 8532 9100

Email: SAMDBEnquiries@sa.gov.au

When to visit

This park is best to explore between Spring and Autumn as it can be very hot and dry during Summer months.

Getting there

Brookfield Conservation Park is located 130km north east of Adelaide, 11km west of Blanchetown. Access is via Sturt Highway.

There is a side gate that is accessible on the eastern perimeter of the park, along Park Road.

Pets in parks

Pets are not permitted within this park. There are however, a number of South Australian National Parks where you can take your dog on a lead. 

Facilities

Enjoy an open air lunch at the picnic ground located via the Mallee Drive Track. Toilets are also located at the picnic ground.

Useful information

Please note: Some areas of this park are restricted to the public and require permission from Conservation Volunteers Australia to enter.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Traditional owners

At the time of European arrival, the Ngaiawang People occupied an area of approximately 388,000 hectares on the Western Murray Plains, in which the park is situated, although no evidence of Aboriginal settlement has been found in the park itself.

Within this area, the river was the main focus of activity, providing a permanent water source and a continuous food supply. Fish were caught in nets and ingenious stone traps, one of which is still preserved in the northern end of McBeans Pound. The river was also a major communication and transport route. Bark canoes were obtained from large river red gums, and several of these canoe trees can still be seen near Blanchetown. The river became the nucleus of settlement as it provided for most needs.

Please refer to the South Australian Museum publication Ngaiawang Folk Province (1977) for further information on Ngaiawang.

History

Brookfield Conservation Park began as a reserve owned by the Chicago Zoological Society. It was purchased in 1971 by the South Australian Government and dedicated as a Conservation Park. The Park is now managed by Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA), who work closely with Park Managers, the Friends of Brookfield Conservation Park and surrounding land managers to establish biological links with nearby areas of habitat.

See and do

Bushwalking

Easy walks

  • Three Habitat Walk (45-60 min, 1km)

The walk was designed and prepared by the Friends of Brookfield. Do the walk early in the morning and you may see the Southern Hairy-nosed wombats venturing out in the cool of dawn to graze on spear grasses, damp with dew. The walk follows a gently undulating loop. There is a bench at each stop where the habitat is explained an you can contemplate the landscape and watch for wildlife.

  • Charcoal Pits Walk (60 min, 1.2km)

This walk takes you through the bush from the picnic area to the charcoal pits. There is a bench seat at the half-way point and a directional sign at each end. The site has 15 pits lined with brick and stone, and the average pit is 3 x 4 metres and 2 metres deep. The bottom of the pit was filled with dry wood and freshly cut mallee was placed on top. Galvanised iron sheets covered the wood which was ignited. When alight, the whole pit was covered in soil. After it was burnt and cooled, the charcoal was graded to remove soil and stones. It was sold, in sacks, to the public in Adelaide or local towns.

Sunset tours

Conservation Volunteers Australia offer sunset tours by arrangement.

Volunteering

If you are interested in volunteering or would like to undertake research in the park, please contact Conservation Volunteers Australia, Adelaide Office.

Conservation Volunteers Australia, Adelaide office

Phone: (+61 8) 8212 0777
Conservation Volunteers Australia website

For further information on volunteering or undertaking research please contact the Program Manager
Email: pcurtis@conservationvolunteers.com.au

Mountain biking

Mountain biking is currently not permitted in this park. 

Stay in the park

Camping is not permitted within this park.

However, there is a scientific research camp available for volunteers and researchers who wish to camp in the park. Approval must also be sought from Conservation Volunteers Australia.

Flora

Fauna

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

Ensure that you:

  • keep to defined walking trails and follow the trail markers
  • wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • carry sufficient drinking water
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • Walk, hike or trek - what's the difference?

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited from 15 November 2016 to 13 April 2017.
  • Gas fires are permitted, other than on days of total fire ban.
  • Ensure you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Know before you go

Please note: Some areas of this park are restricted to the public and require permission from Conservation Volunteers Australia to enter.

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Fees

Entry fees

Come and enjoy this park for free. 

Park pass

This park is not included in the park pass system. 

Camping and accommodation

Camping is not permitted within this park.

However, there is a scientific research camp available for volunteers and researchers who wish to camp in the park. Approval must also be sought from Conservation Volunteers Australia.

Other fees and permits

There are no other fees or permits associated with this park. 

PDF Park Brochure