Brownhill Creek Recreation Park

  • Accomm
  • Picnic Areas
  • Camping
  • Dogs on Lead
  • Horse Riding
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
  • Cycling
PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Trail closure

White Bridge and part of the Shared Use Trail in Brownhill Creek Recreation Park are closed due to repairs.
Details >

Photo by Cath Leo
Photo by Cath Leo
Photo by Cath Leo
Photo by Cath Leo
Photo by Cath Leo
Brownhill Creek SA map

Brownhill Creek is a popular and picturesque recreation park in suburban Adelaide where you can enjoy bushwalking, bike riding and horse riding. There are also shaded picnic tables available for an open air meal.

About

The park's narrow creek flows through a steep sided valley with majestic river red gums, (some more than 300 years old). This area was once a favourite camping, hunting and gathering ground for the Kaurna Aboriginal People.

Large river red gums line Brownhill Creek while blue gum woodland climbs the valley slopes. The park also supports a small, threatened, ecosystem of greybox grassy woodland.

Today, this 51 hectare park offers an escape from the city and includes a horse trail and fenced horse exercise area.

Opening hours

Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resource Centre - Black Hill

Phone: (+61 8) 8336 0901
Email: DEWNR.AMLRBlackHillOffice@sa.gov.au

Getting there

Brownhill Creek Recreation Park is located 8km from Adelaide. 

Access is via Brownhill Creek Road by vehicle or on foot from Northbrook Avenue.

Pets in parks

You and your dog can enjoy this park providing you keep your dog on a lead and under your control at all times. Don't forget to bring your disposable 'doggie-doo' bag to clean up after your dog.

Facilities

Enjoy a lazy Sunday lunch with your family at The Mitcham Lions Club shaded picnic area or the popular Seven Pines picnic area.

Useful information

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Traditional owners

Brownhill Creek was a favourite camping, hunting and gathering ground for the Kaurna (Gar-na) Peoples, who called it Wirraparinga (scrub and camping place). As many as 150 people inhabited the area at one time.

Aboriginal South Australians are the first peoples of our State and have occupied, enjoyed and managed these lands and waters since the creation. For SA's First Peoples, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

Aboriginal peoples' oral histories and creation stories traverse the length and breadth of Australia’s lands and waters, including South Australian Parks. These stories interconnect land and waters with complex meaning and values and hold great cultural significance. We recognise and respect Aboriginal people's ownership of their stories and that they hold rights and obligations to care for Country. It is through these rights and cultural obligations and a shared goal to protect the environment for generations to come that DEWNR is committed to meaningful collaboration and involvement with Aboriginal peoples in the management of our shared parks.

History

The first European to settle in the area was Pastor William Finlayson who arrived in 1837. By 1840, agriculture, market gardening and quarrying were important local industries. Concrete pits were used to store horse manure for the market gardens and to prevent pollution of the creek, while stone quarries provided sandstone and slate for buildings. Remnants of these pits and a colonial keystone arch bridge can be found in the park.

In 1915, the area was declared a National Pleasure Resort, becoming the Brownhill Creek Recreation Park in 1972.

See and do

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. 

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Moderate hikes

  • Wirraparinga Trail (45 mins one way, 2.3km)

    Enjoy the rugged terrain that takes you through shaded areas of old European trees and note the sections of rare grey box woodland on some of the southern slopes.

  • Shared Use Trail (1 hour one way, 3km)

       Walk, bike or horse ride your way along this trail and discover some of the history of the Brownhill Creek area.    

Mountain biking

You can ride your bike on public roads and any specific cycling trails and tracks on offer in this park. 

Please obey signs and use the trail classifications and descriptions, where available, to select trails suitable to your ability. Many trails are shared, so always keep an eye out for others. Generally, cyclists give way to pedestrians. Please be considerate of all trail users at all times.

Learn more about cycling in SA's parks, including other parks offering cycle tracks, trail classification and read the trail user code of practice for important points to remember when planning your bike ride.

Horse riding

You can ride along the sealed roads within the park. Ridding on designated walking trails is prohibited.

Generally both cyclists and walkers give way to horses, and cyclists give way to walkers.

Stay in the park

Within the park you will find the Brownhill Creek Tourist Park where you can rest after a day of exploring and relax among the park’s bushland.

Pitch a tent on the grassed camp sites or relax in one of the three bedroom villas complete with cooking facilities, open plan family room, air conditioning and television.

Flora

Fauna

The creek valley is a natural wildlife corridor for over 40 species of birds and mammals. Permanent residents include kookaburras, bats, possums, water rats, frogs, eastern brown snakes and the occasional koala. The park also provides habitat for the nationally endangered southern brown bandicoot.

Volunteering

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

Ensure that you:

  • when hiking, wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • make sure you have appropriate weather proof clothing
  • carry enough water to be self-sufficient
  • please be respectful of other users at all times
  • stay on the designated trails and connector tracks for your own safety, and prevent the spread of declared weeds to other areas in the park
  • ensure someone knows your approximate location and expected time of return
  • take appropriate maps.
  • Walk, hike or trek - what's the difference?

Mountain biking

To protect the surrounding environment and to ensure the safety of all riders and shared trail users, please be aware of the international Trail Users Code of Practice when using shared trails. Important points to remember include:

  • plan your ride
  • comply with all signs
  • ride only on formed tracks/trails
  • share the trail - obey give way rules
  • avoid riding in wet, muddy conditions
  • ride lightly and leave no trace or rubbish
  • control your bike within your limits
  • clean your bike to avoid the spread of weeds or plant diseases
  • carry sufficient food and drinking water
  • respect the rights of others
  • tell others about the code

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited throughout the year.
  • Gas fires are permitted, other than on days of total fire ban.
  • Ensure you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • keep your dog on a lead at all times and check if there are areas of the park where dogs are not allowed
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Fees

Entry fees

Come and enjoy this park for free. 

Park pass

This park is not included in the park pass system. 

Camping and accommodation

Within the park you will find the Brownhill Creek Tourist Park where you can pitch a tent or relax in their villas. Refer to their website for a list of fees.

Other fees and permits

There are no other fees or permits associated with this park. 

PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Trail closure

White Bridge and part of the Shared Use Trail in Brownhill Creek Recreation Park are closed due to repairs.
Details >