Karte Conservation Park

  • Picnic Areas
  • Campfires Permitted
  • Caravan Sites
  • Toilets
  • Camping
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching
PDF Park Brochure
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Karte SA map

Take the opportunity to enjoy the vast expanse of wilderness and admire stunning views across the district, while bushwalking, camping or having a picnic in Karte Conservation Park.

About

Karte Conservation Park comprises of thick, low scrub covering steep sand dunes which rise up to 40 metres. During the early twentieth century much of the surrounding land was cleared except for those areas that were unsuitable for agriculture.

Interpretive signs along the 1.5km walking trail in the park provide an insight into the importance of the area's remaining vegetation, which provides a habitat for the threatened malleefowl.

Picnic areas and campsites are located near the start of the trail and provide an opportunity to enjoy the park's vast expanse of wilderness and admire stunning views across the district. You may even encounter one of the park's residents such as the western grey kangaroos, echidnas or fat-tailed dunnarts.

Opening hours

Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Contact details

Natural Resource Office - Berri

Phone: (+61 8) 8580 1800

For booking enquiries please email:

DEWNR.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Getting there

Karte Conservation Park is located 30km north west of Pinnaroo. Access is via Pinnaroo to Loxton Road.

Pets in parks

Pets are not permitted within this park. There are however, a number of South Australian National Parks where you can take your dog on a lead. 

Facilities

There are picnic areas, caravan sites, toilets and campsites where camp fires are permitted located in this park.

Campground facilities

Access Caravan access Toilets Picnic tables Washing water BBQ Nearby walking trail
Karte Campground 2WD Y N Y N Y Y

Useful information

Outback Road Report

1300 361 033 (24-hour automated service)
Northern and Western South Australian Outback Roads Temporary Closures, Restrictions and Warnings Report

Traditional owners

Aboriginal South Australians are the first peoples of our State and have occupied, enjoyed and managed these lands and waters since the creation. For SA's First Peoples, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

Aboriginal peoples' oral histories and creation stories traverse the length and breadth of Australia’s lands and waters, including South Australian Parks. These stories interconnect land and waters with complex meaning and values and hold great cultural significance. We recognise and respect Aboriginal people's ownership of their stories and that they hold rights and obligations to care for Country. It is through these rights and cultural obligations and a shared goal to protect the environment for generations to come that DEWNR is committed to meaningful collaboration and involvement with Aboriginal peoples in the management of our shared parks.

See and do

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. 

South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes. Our trails cater for all levels of fitness and adventure and our classification system makes it easy to select an experience suitable for you.

Hard hikes

  • Karte Conservation Park Hike (45 mins return, 1.5km)

    A short but strenuous walk involving steep hills and spectacular views over the district. Take time to read the signs along the way that explain a little about the importance of the vegetation in the area.

    Tracks of the Mallee information sheet

Mountain biking

Mountain biking is currently not permitted in this park. 

Stay in the park

Campsites provide an opportunity to enjoy the park's vast expanse of wilderness and admire stunning views across the district. You may even encounter one of the park's residents such as the western grey kangaroos, echidnas or fat-tailed dunnarts.

There are picnic areas, caravan sites, toilets and campsites where camp fires are permitted located in this park.

Campground facilities

Access Caravan access Toilets Picnic tables Washing water BBQ Nearby walking trail
Karte Campground 2WD Y N Y N Y Y

Fauna

Malleefowl, as the name suggests, live in the mallee areas of Australia and are rated as nationally endangered. Large patches of unburnt mallee in South Australian parks provide important habitat for these unique birds.

Unlike most birds, malleefowl do not spend several weeks at a time sitting on eggs. Instead the eggs are buried in a sand and compost mound that produces enough heat to incubate the eggs. They dedicate up to eleven months a year caring for the nest, yet take no interest in their young once they have hatched.

Given that it's such a long and intensive process to create the right conditions for the eggs to hatch, it would be reasonable to expect that the workload is shared between the male and the female. In fact, this is not the case. The male digs and builds the mound, which is around one metre height and three metres wide. This is a complex and exhausting task. The right amount of compost has to be incorporated at the right depth. The male must wait for enough rain to wet the compost before building the upper layers of the nest. The female lays one large egg each week until she has laid 15-20 eggs. The male opens up the mound to receive each egg, then buries it to the right depth. He then regularly monitors and adjusts the nest temperature. This involves regularly 'testing' the sand at different depths, and scraping sand on and off the mound to keep it at a constant temperature.

The vegetation in the park also provides habitat for the endangered mallee whipbird, and a number of rare orchids. More than forty species of bird call this park home.

Volunteering

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources South Australian Murray-Darling Basin – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

  

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

Ensure that you:

  • when hiking, wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • make sure you have appropriate weather proof clothing
  • carry enough water to be self-sufficient
  • please be respectful of other users at all times
  • stay on the designated trails and connector tracks for your own safety, and prevent the spread of declared weeds to other areas in the park
  • ensure someone knows your approximate location and expected time of return
  • take appropriate maps.
  • Walk, hike or trek - what's the difference?

Camping

When camping in a National Park, it's important to remember the following:

  • Always let someone responsible know your travel plans, especially when travelling in remote areas. It's a good idea to let them know when you expect to return.
  • Check the weather forecast before you leave, including overnight temperatures on the Bureau of Meteorology. Even during very mild weather, the nights can get very cold. 
  • The quality and quantity of water cannot be guaranteed within parks. Please bring plenty of water and food to be self-sufficient.
  • Always camp in designated sites (where applicable) - do not camp beneath trees with overhanging branches, as they can drop without warning. It's also a good idea to check that there no insect nests nearby.
  • Check to make sure you're not camping in a natural waterway, flash floods can happen anytime.
  • If camp fires are permitted, you must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. Extinguish your camp fire with water (not sand or dirt) until the hissing sound stops.
  • Ensure that you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Fire

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

Listen to the local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety. 

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited from 15 November 2016 to 13 April 2017.
  • You must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.
  • Gas fires are permitted through the year, other than on days of Total Fire Ban.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Fees

Entry fees

Vehicle entry to this park is free, however fees apply for camping.

Camping and accommodation

Fees apply to camp in this park.

You must book and pay for your campsite online before you arrive, as cash self-registration stations are no longer in use in this park.

If you are planning a trip for a school group or other large group, please ensure you let the park know of your intentions.

Alternative booking and payment options

Cash payments can be made at the following agents:

For booking enquiries please email:

DEWNR.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Park pass

Holiday Park Pass and Multi Park Pass

Want to explore SA’s parks all year round? Purchase a Multi Park Pass (12 months), or a Holiday Park Pass (for 2 months) which entitles you to vehicle entry not just for this park, but up to an additional 10 parks as well!

Other fees and permits

There are no other fees or permits associated with this park. 

PDF Park Brochure