Get the low-down on wild blackberries

Tempted to eat wild blackberries as you walk up Lofty? Hold up before you pick any – here’s what you need to know.

The falling leaves of autumn rings in blackberry fruiting season. As berries ripen they change colour from green, to red, to black.

You can spot blackberry shrubs while enjoying South Australia’s Mount Lofty Ranges in Belair National Park or Cleland Conservation Park along the popular Waterfall Gully to Mount Lofty summit hike.

But this sweet tasting blackberry is actually a thorny weed for South Australia. So be careful – don’t pop that delicious looking wild berry in your mouth, it may have been sprayed with chemicals.

Pesky weed of a berry

The popular blackberry variety found throughout SA is the European blackberry.

As its name suggests, this prickly fruit-bearing shrub is from Europe and arrived in Australia during the 1800s to enjoy in teas, for medicine, and in fruity pies and jams.

Over time the exotic shrub became an annoyance to the nation. The European blackberry invasively crowds out native vegetation, pinches the water supply, promotes soil erosion, and provides food and shelter for pest animals like foxes and blackbirds.

There are 15 species of the weedy blackberry from Europe seen across SA.

Today the European blackberry is regarded as one of the worst weeds in Australia and is a declared pest plant under SA’s Natural Resources Management Act 2004.

Sprawling berry control

To control the sprawling European blackberry shrub regular chemical spraying is carried out in our parks and reserves, and by councils across the state.

The potentially poisonous chemical spray is absorbed into the plant through the leaves and, or, its roots. Doesn’t sound so appealing now does it?

Foraging in SA

In South Australia, under the National Parks and Wildlife Act, native and exotic plants cannot be removed from our parks and reserves without permission.

So for those with the wild foraging urge, there are many spots outside of the state’s protected parks and reserves to go blackberry picking.

These include wetter areas on the Eyre Peninsula, scattered locations along the Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, as well as forests in the South East – with some isolated infestations in the Riverland, Kangaroo Island, the Mid North and Yorke Peninsula. But check first whether the wild weedy shrub has been sprayed!

Like what you just read? There’s plenty more where this came from. Make sure you don’t miss a post by subscribing to Good Living’s weekly e-news.

Comments

Log in to Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google to make a comment. If you would prefer not to log in you can still make a comment by selecting 'I'd rather post as a guest' after entering your name and email address.

Check our blog comments policy before posting.

This commenting service is powered by Disqus. Disqus is not affliated with the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources.