5 Treasures in Mount Remarkable National Park

Our Mount Remarkable insider shares 5 tips for visiting this incredible park in the Southern Flinders Ranges.

Home to dramatic gorges, picture-perfect ranges and scenic cliff-top views, Mount Remarkable National Park is breathtaking in every sense of the word.

Mambray Creek born and bred Park Operations Ranger Russell Martin has lived and breathed this special place for 12 years. Here are his top tips for visiting.

1. View across the gulf from the Battery Track

For sublime views over the Spencer Gulf, head to the Battery Track. You can get there by taking the Hidden Gorge trail from the Day Visitor Area at Mambray Creek. This is a great spot to sit quietly and enjoy your lunch or morning coffee. You may even be lucky enough to see native wildlife including wedge-tailed eagles, yellow-footed rock wallabies and euros.

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2. Alligator Gorge

Surprisingly, there are no alligators in Alligator Gorge. Rumour has it that this scenic gorge is named after a local shepherd named Ally, who lived in the area. You can expect to be surrounded by colourful rock formations and narrowly-spaced cliffs. If the creek is running, and there’s water in the gorge, it makes this peaceful place extra special.

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The Narrows, Alligator Gorge (image courtesy of Jason Tyndall, Nature Play South Australia)

3. Hikes

Hidden Gorge

Accessible from Mambray Creek, this all-day hike will take you between 6-8 hours return. A peaceful and relaxing walk, it’ll transport you to another world as you meander through narrow gorges, take in magnificent views from the high Battery Ridge and notice the habitat including native pines. Be prepared with lots of water and appropriate footwear as you’ll be walking over uneven surfaces and will cover 18 kilometres.

Daveys Gully Hike

If an all-day walk isn’t for you, take this 2.4 kilometre hike. It’s accessible from Mambray Creek and is an easy gradient that will take you about one hour return. You’ll get some great views into the Alligator Basin and across the Spencer Gulf to Whyalla. If you need a spot to rest, a new seat has been installed along the way thanks to the Friends of Mount Remarkable National Park volunteer group.

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Seat installed on Daveys Gully hike

4. Gray’s Hut

Burnt down in the 1988 fires that tore through the park, this old shepherd’s hut has been rebuilt. It’s situated in a lovely spot in the park, accessible by foot, referred to as the ‘racetrack.’ Rumour has it a local used to train his race horses here in secret, away from the eyes of the competition. The hut is built on a clearing surrounded by big gum trees, which makes this area perfect for camping. You can even stay in the hut if it’s vacant when you get there.

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5. Wildlife

There’s a plethora of wildlife that call Mount Remarkable National Park home. You can see yellow-footed rock wallabies bounce, emus stroll, euros (a species of wallaroo) hop and lace monitors scurry through the park. Mornings and evenings are the best time to spot them – especially in the Mambray Creek valley.

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Emus in Mount Remarkable National Park (image courtesy of Jason Tyndall, Nature Play South Australia)

Throughout the month of May, Mount Remarkable National Park is being celebrated as the Park of Month – an initiative between Nature Play SA and DEWNR.

Get a taste of our Park of the Month by checking out the list of events for May. Celebrate Mother’s Day with Mother Nature, try Pilates or a guided walk, or discover treasure in Alligator Gorge. Want more ideas of what to see when you get there? Download Nature Play SA’s list of 20 things to discover.

Don’t forget to book your campsite online before you go.

If you’re a fan of Mount Remarkable National Park, send us your photos and tips for visiting in the comments below.

Main image courtesy of Jason Tyndall, Nature Play SA.

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