Animal tales

Here's a few animals that came to us each with a curious tale to tell. Warning: cuteness overload.

Return to sender

This unstamped mail is a pygmy possum (main picture) which unexpectedly turned up in a Minlaton mail bag. Our Innes National Park rangers cared for it overnight then returned it to its natural environment in southern‪ ‎Yorke Peninsula. Pygmy possums, although nocturnal and hard to spot, are another great reason to visit Innes National Park

Baby boom

Last year we celebrated the arrival of sixty Idnya babies (western quolls) to the Flinders Ranges. These Idnya are the first to be born in the Flinders Ranges for more than 150 years and are the offspring of western quolls that were reintroduced to the park last year (photo: Hannah Bannister).

A baby Idnya (wester quoll) stares inquisitively at the camera.

A unique find

This juvenile leafy seadragon was spotted and photographed by Carl Charter while he was diving Hallett Cove beach reef. It’s around 4 to 6 weeks old and measures 8 cm. Carl says adult leafys haven’t been reported in the metropolitan area for at least 10 years, making this a really exciting find. If you see a leafy sea dragon, report your sighting to help Reef Watch SA.

This magnificent leafy sea dragon was spotted by Carl Charter in the Hallett Cove beach reef.

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