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How will my unsolicited proposal be assessed?

DEWNR’s Unsolicited Proposals process is guided by the Guidelines for the Assessment of Unsolicited Proposals (the Guidelines). This assessment is aimed towards determining whether:

  • the proposal is approvable, meaning it can meet minimum legislative requirements; and
  • DEWNR will deal with you on an exclusive basis.

Unsolicited proposals are assessed and managed in three stages: 

Stage 1: Assessment

DEWNR will review the submitted Application Form and request further detail if required. DEWNR will assess the proposal against the five criteria in the Guidelines and undertake an initial review of whether the proposal is approvable.

The assessment is referred to an internal panel, the Unsolicited Proposals Governance Committee (Governance Committee). This committee determines whether the initial proposal:

  • should not be accepted as the criteria are not met or it cannot not meet minimum legislative requirements; or
  • is not suitable for exclusive negotiation and should be considered via a standard procurement process; or
  • should proceed to Stage 2 and the proponent be requested to submit a detailed proposal.

Stage 2: Detailed proposal and assessment

DEWNR will appoint a Case Manager who will work with you to assess the feasibility of the proposal in greater detail.

You will be responsible for preparing a detailed proposal, responding to further information requirements or coordinating other necessary approvals, for example negotiating an Indigenous Land Use Agreement, development approvals or aquaculture licences. The DEWNR Case Manager may seek advice from internal and external stakeholders, and conduct community consultation if required.  

Once the proposal has been assessed and it is shown to both meet the criteria and that all relevant approvals can be obtained the Case Manager will prepare a Stage 2 Assessment Report to present to Governance Committee recommending whether the detailed proposal:

  • should not be accepted as the criteria are not met or it cannot not meet minimum legislative requirements; or
  • is not suitable for exclusive negotiation but may be appropriate for consideration via a standard procurement process; or
  • should proceed to Stage 3 as the detailed proposal meets the criteria and there is appropriate justification to proceed. 

Stage 3: Contract negotiation

Stage 3 involves formalising the proposal. All parties negotiate the final legal and commercial terms, and once these terms are mutually agreed, formal approvals are sought from the relevant delegate, Minister or Cabinet if required.

Further detail about the processes and criteria for assessment is in the Information for Proponents document

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